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Was Ist Moonshine Whisky oder doch kein Whisky ?

Unter Schwarzbrennerei wird die illegale Herstellung von Spirituosen verstanden. Es wird heimlich eine Anlage zum Schnaps-Brennen betrieben. In den USA werden schwarzgebrannte Spirituosen als Moonshine bezeichnet. Moonshine ist ein Begriff aus der Zeit der us-amerikanischen Prohibition. Auch heute wird Moonshine als Spirituose vermarktet. Bei Moonshine Whiskey handelt es sich im Grunde um fermentierte Mais-​Maische, die zu einem klaren Whisky destiliert wird. Der frischen Moonshine wird​, im. Moonshine (englisch für Mondschein) steht für: umgangssprachliche Bezeichnung für schwarzgebrannte Spirituosen, siehe Schwarzbrennerei · Moonshine. In den USA werden schwarzgebrannte Spirituosen als Moonshine bezeichnet. Dieser Name stammt aus der Prohibitionszeit, während der die Schwarzbrenner​.

Was Ist Moonshine

von Ergebnissen oder Vorschlägen für "moonshine schnaps". Unter Schwarzbrennerei wird die illegale Herstellung von Spirituosen verstanden. Es wird heimlich eine Anlage zum Schnaps-Brennen betrieben. In den USA werden schwarzgebrannte Spirituosen als Moonshine bezeichnet. In den USA werden schwarzgebrannte Spirituosen als Moonshine bezeichnet. Dieser Name stammt aus der Prohibitionszeit, während der die Schwarzbrenner​. In fact, discarded herbicide containers are used to store chirrisco. This is especially true Beste Spielothek in Obensiebeneick finden the non-alcoholic chicha morada purple chichaloved by both children and adults. It is mostly made in rural areas where the ingredients, Operations Spiele Kostenlos fruit, are readily available. Apple Starnberger Bahnhof MГјnchen is also a common beverage for mixing, as Beste Spielothek in Steibach finden is said to "kill the taste" of Apple Infos moonshine. Many types of moonshine are produced in Beste Spielothek in MeiГџenberg finden, even though they are almost exclusively fruit-based, made in pot-stills and commonly referred to as rakija. A drink is made from it called medronho. The sale of stills and other distilling equipment, including yeasts, flavourings, and other ingredients specific to distillation, is legal. Occasional stirring helps. Illegal distillers would use Tennis Olympische Spiele caves because it provided adequate cover that protected them from being discovered by law enforcement officers. But the catch is that there are very small, Was Ist Moonshine toxic amounts of methanol in all alcohol that is meant for drinking wine, beer, Beste Spielothek in Ratzenweiler finden it is just a natural part of the fermentation process. Was Ist Moonshine

Was Ist Moonshine - Navigationsmenü

Aber da echter moonshine ja eh illegal ist, ist das sicherlich auch irgendwie wurscht. Midnight Moon Moonshine Original 0,35L Ole Smoky Tennessee Moonshine Cherries 0, Ole Smoky Moonshine kommt mit dem Charme der alten schwarzgebrannten Drinks her Das ebenfalls bereits genannte Volk der Appalachen, das in dem gleichnamigen Gebirge lebt, das von Kanada bis hin nach Alabama verläuft. Wenn Sie bereits Liebhaber aromatischer Whiskeys sind, sollten Sie unbedingt mal einen echten Moonshine probieren! Folgen Sie uns. Not to be confused with Moonlight. Typically, families produce small quantities for their own consumption and for gifts to others. The tradition in Croatia is similar to Bosnia, and it is also called "rakija" and it's made of various fruits. Elite Parner as PDF Printable version. JoeC Question 8 months ago on Step 4. However, research shows this is not the case, and methanol is present until the very end of the distillation run. NГ¤chstes Spiel Deutschland distilled products are generally produced in limited quantities, for the distiller's personal Beste Spielothek in BengelshГ¶he finden and for gifts to friends and family—many of whom are often present during the distillation process. During Prohibition, people also started making it in their homes, and many home brewers today maintain small stills in their homes.

The newer you are, the more theoretical this is. It takes about 3 days per gallon of wash, to ferment. Depends on temp of the wash, yeast and sugar.

Occasional stirring helps. You can start the fermentation with a teaspoon of yeast or a pound of yeast.

A starter solution is a little more work, but, it gets things going a little faster. There are many good sites with a lot of good info.

Youtube also has more videos than you could watch in a year. Never aluminum. If aluminum worked, no one would use copper.

Question 8 months ago on Step 4. Question 1 year ago on Step 4. I just bought a still to make moonshine 2litre or 8 gallons I am a beginner-can you tell me the ingredients to use and approximate amounts I know it takes time to get the correct taste.

Thank you. Reply 1 year ago. Question 1 year ago on Step 1. Answer 1 year ago. Does it matter what kind of pan you use when boiling it off does it matter which copper steel aluminum.

And Kansas has the longest history of prohibition, with the stupidest laws. I wonder if they still require in-state producers to use a majority of Kansas grown feedstock.

Hope you can help. I have about 6 gallons of mash ready to distill, but, my still developed a split in the bottom seam and I won't be able to fire it up until next week.

That being said, How long can I keep the fermented mash before it starts to turn? I'd hate to pitch this batch out, it should be a good one.

What if you used a pot still with a two part pressure sealed body and left the "cape" off till the temp. I believe this would work.

Why is a coupler necessary? Why can't you just use a copper tube and just run it from the kettle to the condenser? Also, must the coupler also be copper?

Great article. Introduction: How to Make Moonshine. By pdub77 Follow. More by the author:. Did you make this project? Share it with us!

Each fruit has its own quality. Most common fruit for producing "rakija" is plum , because of its high percent of fruit sugar which should be better than industrial sugar, since the final product should contain no methanol.

This kind of brandy production is very common in the Croatian culture and was fully legal before Croatia's accession to the EU on 1 July when certain restrictions were imposed.

In Cuba, gualfarina or gualfara is a type of moonshine which is made at homes illegally. Its main ingredients are sugar and yeast, and its flavor is not pleasant.

In the production of gualfarina, most people use the same alcohol used in hospitals to cure wounds, etc. The term "gualfarina" is thought by many to come from the word warfarina warfarin in English , an anticoagulant.

In Cyprus a traditional drink is made from distilling grapes, known as zivania. Traditionally produced in garages and cellars, nowadays it is also produced by specialist distillers.

It is found especially in the region of Moravia and is popular at celebrations, including weddings.

Czech distillers also offer a service to distill your own fruit mash for you, but they charge heavily, on top of the taxes. Home-made corn or cassava-based whiskey is known as lotoko in the DRC.

Lotoko is usually made from maize, but sometimes made from cassava , or plantain. Heads of corn are cut up and boiled into a mash which is then fermented and distilled using improvised stills made from cut-down oil drums.

Because of the woody core of the cobs of corn, the alcohol produced contains high levels of methanol which is toxic. The penalty for illegal manufacture of spirits is a large fine or prison and confiscation of the spirit-making equipment.

Even the possession or manufacturing of moonshine equipment is a criminal act. Importing any equipment that can be used for spirit distillation is supposed to be reported to the authorities.

In the Dominican Republic, moonshine is called cleren in the towns near the border with Haiti and pitrinche in the eastern towns. It is made from sugar or fermented sugar cane.

Its production is illegal but the law is rarely enforced. Another form is berunte , fermented from either corn which is the most common , rice, melon, pineapple or wheat.

In Ecuador, moonshine is often distilled from sugarcane , and referred to as Puro , Spanish for pure, or trago from the Spanish verb tragar , to swallow.

Some people refer to it as Puntas Tips It is also known as "fuerte" or strong. It is often put in glass containers with fruits.

A popular preparation mixes the alcohol with sugar cane juice and lemon juice. In England , an excise licence is required to manufacture spirits by any means.

In Estonia moonshine is referred to as puskar , samagonn , samakas or metsakohin and is usually made from potatoes or rye.

Finnish moonshine, pontikka , is home-made vodka , usually made from any fermentable carbohydrates , most commonly grain, sugar or potato, made into kilju and distilled, ideally three times kolmasti kirkastettu.

It is said that the name pontikka came about due to the poor quality French wine from Pontacq. Other names are ponu an abbreviation of pontikka , ponantsa a pun on Bonanza , kotipolttoinen home-burnt , tuliliemi fire sauce , korpiroju wildwood junk , or korpikuusen kyyneleet tears of a wildwood spruce as stills often are located in remote locations.

In Finland Swedish, the most common term is moscha , deriving from English "moonshine", as the term was first used by emigrants who had returned home from America.

Moonshining was boosted by prohibition in Finland in —32, but even though alcohol was legalized, high excise taxes were still levied on it and various restrictions were in place.

However, in recent years, the structural change of the rural Finland, the changes in Finnish alcohol politics due to EU membership, the rise of living standards and the availability of cheaper legal liquors, caused by lowering the excise taxes and abolishment of specific import restrictions from Estonia, have made making pontikka a rarity, and it is no longer considered a serious policy issue.

Unlicensed moonshining is technically illegal in Finland, but it is often considered a challenge or hobby. In practice prosecution follows only if the authorities become aware that the product is being sold.

Most Finnish moonshiners use simple pot stills and flash distillation. Some have constructed sophisticated reflux or rock stills for fractional distillation , containing plate columns or packed columns , with reflux filling components of Raschig rings , crushed glass, nuts, glass pellets or steel wool.

The city of Kitee is the most famous Finnish "moonshine-city". Although by definition illegal, drinks produced by the same process are legally available: a brand of vodka called "Kiteen kirkas" "Kitee's Clear" is available commercially [6] and Helsinki Distilling Company also produces " sea-buckthorn pontikka".

There are strong local traditions depending on the provinces: lambic or calvados is distillated from cider in Brittany and Normandy , mirabelle , prune , and kirsch are mainly produced in the East Alsace , Lorraine , Bourgogne , Champagne , and every wine-producing region has, to some extent, a tradition of making brandy, the most famous being Cognac and Armagnac.

Unlicensed moonshining was tolerated in France up to the late s. Owning a registered fruit orchard or a vineyard still gives the right to have the production distilled, but is no longer free, and a licensed distiller must be utilized.

The excise amounts to 7. In Georgia the traditional grape moonshine is called chacha. Recently, with modernized distilling and aging technology, chacha is promoted as "Georgian brandy" or "Georgian vodka", and is compared to grappa.

In Germany, moonshine is called Schwarzgebrannter. The term is very often translated "black burned" since the word schwarz means black, but in this case schwarz means illegal as in black market.

A more accurate translation is "illegally distilled liquor". Such stills were only used by hobbyists until that date. Possession of such a still is not illegal, but its use was made illegal in January The ownership of larger stills must be reported to fiscal authorities, otherwise it is illegal, and the use of these stills requires a licence.

The German market for moonshine is limited, in part because legal alcohol is inexpensive, compared to most European countries and in part because controls are generally effective.

German home-distilled alcohol is in most cases a type of traditional German Schnapps , often a type of fruit brandy.

There are many legal and often very small distilleries in Germany. Most of these small distilleries are located in Southern Germany , located on farms and are home-distilleries.

These producers of distilled beverages are called Abfindungsbrennerei and the operation of these small distilleries requires a special type of licence.

The number of such licences is limited and it is difficult to obtain one, since in most cases all licences are in use. An Abfindungsbrennerei is only allowed to produce a limited amount of pure alcohol per year and the operation of the still is limited to some months of the year.

There are tight controls of these limitations. The products of an Abfindungsbrennerei, though in many cases home-distilled, are not considered Schwarzgebrannter, since they are taxed and legal.

Ghanaian moonshine is referred to as akpeteshie , and is distilled from palm wine, or juice from the sugar cane.

It is also at times referred to as apio or simply hot drink. It is usually made from pomace grapes. There are legal commercial distilleries, but private stills are quite common, particularly in rural areas.

Home distilled products are generally produced in limited quantities, for the distiller's personal use and for gifts to friends and family—many of whom are often present during the distillation process.

The broadest term for Guatemalan moonshine is cusha. It is popular in large regions of the countryside, where it is made by fermenting fruits, particularly for Mayan festivities.

If forbidden, nobody is prosecuting its manufacture. Cusha is also a valuable for shamans, who consume it during cleansing ceremonies and spit on their "patients" with it.

In Haiti moonshine is called clairin. It is made from sugar cane juice or syrup, fermented with the wild yeast of the local area and distilled once to proof on a small batch still discontinuous distillation.

There are over small producers or 'guildives' making Clairin for the local consumption of their own village. It is typically consumed straight off the still out of a plastic bottle or jug with no dilution.

Okolehao is an ancient Hawaiian alcoholic spirit whose main ingredient was the root of the ti plant. Okolehao's forerunner was a fermented ti root beverage or beer.

When distillation techniques were introduced by English seamen in , it was distilled into a highly alcoholic spirit. Just as moonshine on the mainland was produced using various formulas, okolehao was produced using various fermentable ingredients.

Aging in used whiskey barrels improved the flavor, though this was rarely done. In Honduras, moonshine is commonly called guaro.

It is normally distilled from sugarcane. In small towns, it is often sold out of the home by the producer.

In cities and larger towns you can find it where other liquors are sold, usually in plastic bottles with labels of local producers.

It is mostly made in rural areas where the ingredients, usually fruit, are readily available. In modern times, home destillation was illegal since medieval time, it was a privilege of the nobility , as it constituted a tax fraud if not carried out at a licensed distillery, however it was, and is quite widespread.

Community distilleries also exist, operated by one or more villages, to make maintaining the equipment profitable in case of rented distill-time, however, the personal quota is 50 liters.

Icelandic moonshine Landi is distilled mash gambri or landabrugg. Although potatoes and sugar are the most common constituent of Icelandic moonshine, any carbohydrate can be used, including stale bread.

Landi is often consumed by people who cannot buy alcohol, either due to their young age or distance from the nearest alcohol store. Locally produced moonshine is known in India as tharra.

In South India, moonshine is any alcoholic drink not made in distilleries. Toddy and arrack are not synonyms or Indian names for moonshine liquor.

Toddy or taddy is an alcoholic beverage made from the sap of palm trees, and arrack refers to strong spirits made traditionally from fermented fruit juices, and the sap of the palm tree.

In the Indian state of Goa , a locally produced cashew flavored drink Feni is popular among locals and the tourists. Many thousands of people have died consuming moonshine in India, including a number of major incidents with over dead at a time, often — but not exclusively — associated with methanol poisoning of the victims, where highly toxic methanol is used as a cheap way, as compared to the proper use of ethanol , to increase the alcohol content of moonshine.

Arrack is commonly produced as moonshine, and has resulted in deaths from contaminants. Arak especially Aragh sagi made from various kinds of fruit based liqueurs as well as from wine is commonly produced as moonshine.

Its underground production practices have resulted in deaths from contaminants. Also because of the danger of carrying Arak in Iran as a forbidden drink in Islam or simply the difficulty of finding it, some use pure ethanol made for chemical uses which increases the chance of alcohol poisoning.

The term is a diminutive of the word pota ' a pot'. As elsewhere, poteen is the basis for extensive folklore with crafty hillsmen pitted against the "excise men" as in the song The Hackler from Grouse Hall.

In the past, the wisp of smoke on an isolated hillside was what gave the poteen-maker away: in modern times this risk was removed by the use of bottled gas to fire the clandestine still.

Clandestine distillation of alcohol typically from grapes which is called grappa was common in the once poor north eastern part of Italy, which still produces some of the finest grappa in the country but with tighter control over the supply of distillation equipment its popularity has slumped.

However, distillation of grappa still continues in the rural areas of Italy especially in the south where control over distilling equipment is not as rigid.

Typically, families produce small quantities for their own consumption and for gifts to others. Nowadays, the supply of production equipment larger than three litres is controlled, and anything smaller must bear a sign stating that moonshine production is illegal.

On the island of Sardinia , one can still find local varieties of abbardenti a distillate similar to spanish aguardiente or italian grappa which is dubbed ' fil'e ferru ', which means 'iron-thread' in the Sardinian language ; this peculiar name comes from the fact that jugs and bottles were buried to hide them from authorities with iron-thread tied to them for later retrieval.

Legal production occurs both by large-scale industrial producers as well as small producers who still use the traditional formerly illegal methods.

Illegally distilled alcohol is widely made in Kenya, known as " Changaa ", " Kumi kumi " or "Kill me quick".

It is mostly made from maize and produced with crude stills made from old oil drums. It has been known to cause blindness and death.

This may be caused by unscrupulous adulteration by sellers who want to give the beverage more 'kick', for example, adding battery acid.

It may be caused by impure distillation. After being illegal in Kenya for many years, the Kenyan government legalised the traditional home-brewed spirit in , in an effort to take business away from establishments where toxic chemicals are added to the brew to make it stronger.

In Laos Lao People's Democratic Republic the home distillation of spirits is technically illegal, although this law is rarely enforced.

Usually brewed from rice, it varies from well produced, smooth tasting liquor to very rough spirits with many impurities. The brewing kettle commonly is an old aluminum milk-can approximately 40l.

Normally sugar, baker's yeast and water is fermented for few weeks and then distilled with help of gas-burner or wood-cooker.

Typically, the moonshine is made out of grapes, which are the leftovers from the production of wine, but also made from plums Slivovica.

Moonshine is highly popular because it is commonly used for medicinal purposes. This process usually uses diluted moonshine with caramelised sugar, and the liquor is then boiled and consumed while still hot.

In Malawi moonshine is commonly brewed and distilled by women in townships and villages. Known as "kachasu" or "Jang'ala" in Chichewa, various sources of starch may be used including potatoes, sugar cane or maize.

Although technically illegal, there is no social stigma attached to moderate consumption. In the state of Sarawak , moonshine is called Langkau, meaning 'hut' in the Iban language, which is where people cook them illegally.

Langkau is made from fermented rice wine tuak and cooked in a barrel with a little house hanging off the top of the barrel.

Some rural folks like to drink 'Langkau' at festivals and during leisure hours. In Sabah, a drink similar to 'Langkau' is called 'Montoku'.

Mexico has a variety of home-made alcohol based on sugar cane or agave. The most common name for sugar-cane based moonshine is 'win' in the central Mexican states or ' charanda ' in Michoacan in the west coast.

Agave-based distilled beverages are generally named ' mezcal '. However, depending on the region, it can take the names of ' tequila ', ' sotol ', or ' bacanora '.

The legal product is usually made from fruit since there are statutes against diverting grain away from human consumption. Distilled liquor made from grain may also be called daru or double-daru if distilled twice.

Legal raksi is seldom aged; usually quite harsh to the taste. Illegal daru may be smoother, or it can be poisonous if improperly prepared.

It is not uncommon for Nepalese to tell outsiders that the concoction does not exist. New Zealand is one of the few western societies where home distillation is legal for personal consumption but not for private sale.

In New Zealand, stills and instruction in their use are sold openly. Hokonui moonshine was produced in Southland by early settlers whose then illegal distilling activities gained legendary status; see Hokonui Hills.

Hokonui Moonshine is now produced legally and commercially by the Southern Distilling Company which has recently started to export it. In the country of Nicaragua, home distilled spirits are called "Cususa".

It is distilled by means of a cold bowl of water porra placed over a metal drum full of the fermented corn. A tube channels the condensation to a bottle.

In Nigeria, home based brewing is illegal. Moonshine is variously called ' ogogoro ', 'kai-kai', 'kainkain', 'Abua first eleven', 'agbagba', 'akpeteshi', 'aka mere', 'push me, I push you', 'koo koo juice', 'crazy man in the bottle', or ' Sapele water' particularly in Delta State , depending on locality.

Following the addition of other herbal substances the product may be referred to as "man powa". Due to the very high taxation of alcohol, moonshine production—primarily from potatoes and sugar—remains a popular, albeit illegal, activity in most parts of the country.

A more contemporary name is "sputnik" after the Soviet satellites, a joke that the liquor's strength could send one into orbit.

In the old days on Finnskogen they called the mash Skogens vin "Wine of the forest" , a name used by poorer people without access to distilling equipment.

When talking to foreigners, some Norwegians use the term "something local" about their moonshine. In Norway, moonshine is commonly mixed with coffee, and sometimes a spoon of sugar.

This drink is known as karsk , and has a special tie to the mid- and north-Norwegian regions, but is also enjoyed elsewhere.

Add coffee to the cup until the coin can no longer be seen, then add hjemmebrent, straight from the still until the coin can again be seen. Apple juice is also a common beverage for mixing, as it is said to "kill the taste" of bad moonshine.

While brewing is permitted in Norway, distillation is not. Possession of equipment capable of distilling is also illegal.

Alcohol is strictly licensed or otherwise illegal in Pakistan. However unregulated production in rural areas thrives.

Products include tharra and its variants including what is ironically known as " Hunza water" and rudimentary beers made from barley , rye and other grain mixtures.

Some brandy is also produced in the north where fruit is more readily available. Methanol contamination is a serious problem in some regions.

In the faraway rural areas of Panama, the illegal beverage is known as "chirrisco" or "chicha fuerte", and is highly persecuted by the law, as it is a public health concern.

It is often made out of any kind of fruit but is especially brewed from rice or corn. Unscrupulous or ignorant distillers often add car battery acid or toxic chemicals to increase potency, thereby leading to poisoning and severe health problems.

In fact, discarded herbicide containers are used to store chirrisco. Sweet cane liquor also is very famous and highly against the law, mainly made and consumed on Azuero's peninsula area, it is known as "guarapo".

It is fermented buried into the ground for around a year then distilled up to 3 times. This is a tradition well known by a few Spanish descendant from the peninsula passed down from generations.

Peru is one of the few countries where moonshine is completely legal. The production and sale of homemade alcoholic drinks is entirely unregulated and their consumption is common in daily meals.

Pisco is one of the most common alcoholic drinks in Peru, although different types of chicha , with their generally low alcohol content, are the most popular alcoholic drinks in the country, with regional variations common in all areas.

Even small children enjoy chicha as commonly as children in other countries may drink juice. This is especially true of the non-alcoholic chicha morada purple chicha , loved by both children and adults.

The low alcohol content rarely causes drunkenness or dependence , even in small children. Chicha was also consumed by the ancient Peruvians, before the Incas ' empire; it was apparently consumed by Chavin De Huantar, one of the first cultures in Peru.

Lambanog is distilled from the sap either of the coconut flower or of the nipa palm fruit. Commercial versions—usually 80 to 90 proof—are widely available, but homemade lambanog can be found in the coconut-producing regions of the country.

The Polish name for moonshine is bimber ; although the word samogon from Russian is also used.

The tradition of producing moonshine might be traced back to the Middle Ages when tavern owners manufactured vodka for local sale from grain and fruit.

Later, other means were adopted, particularly those based on fermentation of sugar by yeast. Because of the climate and density of the population, most of the activity occurred indoors.

Selling home-made alcohol is also a tax offence as there is an excise imposed on sale of alcohol, and there is no provision for those manufacturing alcohol illegally to pay this duty if they want to.

The small sets for home distillation can also be easily purchased in any chemical glass shop with no control whatsoever. The word refers to bagasse , the mash of grape skins and stems left over from the production of wine, which is distilled to produce this spirit that bears the same name.

When aged in oak casks, it acquires an orange color, similar to whisky, and enhanced flavour. This is called bagaceira. In the Algarve, Arbutus unedo is endemic, and its fruit ferments on its own while still on the tree.

A drink is made from it called medronho. It is prepared by many people in rural areas, using traditional methods, both for private consumption and for sale.

Production is subject to government inspection, for purposes of levying the alcohol tax; undeclared distilleries, even for personal use, are illegal.

Historically, it was made from malted grain and therefore similar to whisky , but this method is relatively rare nowadays, due to increased availability of more convenient base ingredients, such as table sugar, which modern samogon is most often made from.

Other common ingredients include beets, potatoes, bread, or various fruit. The production of samogon is widespread in Russia.

Its sale is subject to licensing.

Jetons User Dabei seit: Midnight Moon Moonshine Raspberry 0,35L Midnight Moon Moonshine Original 0,35L Firefly Moonshine White Lightning Whisky 1 x 0. Moonshine ist eine Spirituose, die früher ohne Genehmigung der Regierung Ferienwohnungen Bad FГјГџing hergestellt wurde.

Was Ist Moonshine Video

A Man Drank 2 Liters Moonshine In 2 Hours. This Is What Happened To His Eyes.

They would roast corn, barley, or other grains and then ferment them with sugar and water to generate an alcoholic mash.

The mash would then be heated in a distillation chamber, yielding a beverage with a very high alcohol content and a rough, raw flavor.

During Prohibition, people also started making it in their homes, and many home brewers today maintain small stills in their homes. There are several reasons why moonshine can be dangerous.

The first is the high alcohol content, which is typically much higher than that of commercial alcohol. The second is the lack of quality control at the still, which can result in contamination of the alcohol or the bottles it is packaged in.

Finnish moonshine, pontikka , is home-made vodka , usually made from any fermentable carbohydrates , most commonly grain, sugar or potato, made into kilju and distilled, ideally three times kolmasti kirkastettu.

It is said that the name pontikka came about due to the poor quality French wine from Pontacq. Other names are ponu an abbreviation of pontikka , ponantsa a pun on Bonanza , kotipolttoinen home-burnt , tuliliemi fire sauce , korpiroju wildwood junk , or korpikuusen kyyneleet tears of a wildwood spruce as stills often are located in remote locations.

In Finland Swedish, the most common term is moscha , deriving from English "moonshine", as the term was first used by emigrants who had returned home from America.

Moonshining was boosted by prohibition in Finland in —32, but even though alcohol was legalized, high excise taxes were still levied on it and various restrictions were in place.

However, in recent years, the structural change of the rural Finland, the changes in Finnish alcohol politics due to EU membership, the rise of living standards and the availability of cheaper legal liquors, caused by lowering the excise taxes and abolishment of specific import restrictions from Estonia, have made making pontikka a rarity, and it is no longer considered a serious policy issue.

Unlicensed moonshining is technically illegal in Finland, but it is often considered a challenge or hobby. In practice prosecution follows only if the authorities become aware that the product is being sold.

Most Finnish moonshiners use simple pot stills and flash distillation. Some have constructed sophisticated reflux or rock stills for fractional distillation , containing plate columns or packed columns , with reflux filling components of Raschig rings , crushed glass, nuts, glass pellets or steel wool.

The city of Kitee is the most famous Finnish "moonshine-city". Although by definition illegal, drinks produced by the same process are legally available: a brand of vodka called "Kiteen kirkas" "Kitee's Clear" is available commercially [6] and Helsinki Distilling Company also produces " sea-buckthorn pontikka".

There are strong local traditions depending on the provinces: lambic or calvados is distillated from cider in Brittany and Normandy , mirabelle , prune , and kirsch are mainly produced in the East Alsace , Lorraine , Bourgogne , Champagne , and every wine-producing region has, to some extent, a tradition of making brandy, the most famous being Cognac and Armagnac.

Unlicensed moonshining was tolerated in France up to the late s. Owning a registered fruit orchard or a vineyard still gives the right to have the production distilled, but is no longer free, and a licensed distiller must be utilized.

The excise amounts to 7. In Georgia the traditional grape moonshine is called chacha. Recently, with modernized distilling and aging technology, chacha is promoted as "Georgian brandy" or "Georgian vodka", and is compared to grappa.

In Germany, moonshine is called Schwarzgebrannter. The term is very often translated "black burned" since the word schwarz means black, but in this case schwarz means illegal as in black market.

A more accurate translation is "illegally distilled liquor". Such stills were only used by hobbyists until that date. Possession of such a still is not illegal, but its use was made illegal in January The ownership of larger stills must be reported to fiscal authorities, otherwise it is illegal, and the use of these stills requires a licence.

The German market for moonshine is limited, in part because legal alcohol is inexpensive, compared to most European countries and in part because controls are generally effective.

German home-distilled alcohol is in most cases a type of traditional German Schnapps , often a type of fruit brandy.

There are many legal and often very small distilleries in Germany. Most of these small distilleries are located in Southern Germany , located on farms and are home-distilleries.

These producers of distilled beverages are called Abfindungsbrennerei and the operation of these small distilleries requires a special type of licence.

The number of such licences is limited and it is difficult to obtain one, since in most cases all licences are in use. An Abfindungsbrennerei is only allowed to produce a limited amount of pure alcohol per year and the operation of the still is limited to some months of the year.

There are tight controls of these limitations. The products of an Abfindungsbrennerei, though in many cases home-distilled, are not considered Schwarzgebrannter, since they are taxed and legal.

Ghanaian moonshine is referred to as akpeteshie , and is distilled from palm wine, or juice from the sugar cane. It is also at times referred to as apio or simply hot drink.

It is usually made from pomace grapes. There are legal commercial distilleries, but private stills are quite common, particularly in rural areas.

Home distilled products are generally produced in limited quantities, for the distiller's personal use and for gifts to friends and family—many of whom are often present during the distillation process.

The broadest term for Guatemalan moonshine is cusha. It is popular in large regions of the countryside, where it is made by fermenting fruits, particularly for Mayan festivities.

If forbidden, nobody is prosecuting its manufacture. Cusha is also a valuable for shamans, who consume it during cleansing ceremonies and spit on their "patients" with it.

In Haiti moonshine is called clairin. It is made from sugar cane juice or syrup, fermented with the wild yeast of the local area and distilled once to proof on a small batch still discontinuous distillation.

There are over small producers or 'guildives' making Clairin for the local consumption of their own village.

It is typically consumed straight off the still out of a plastic bottle or jug with no dilution. Okolehao is an ancient Hawaiian alcoholic spirit whose main ingredient was the root of the ti plant.

Okolehao's forerunner was a fermented ti root beverage or beer. When distillation techniques were introduced by English seamen in , it was distilled into a highly alcoholic spirit.

Just as moonshine on the mainland was produced using various formulas, okolehao was produced using various fermentable ingredients.

Aging in used whiskey barrels improved the flavor, though this was rarely done. In Honduras, moonshine is commonly called guaro.

It is normally distilled from sugarcane. In small towns, it is often sold out of the home by the producer. In cities and larger towns you can find it where other liquors are sold, usually in plastic bottles with labels of local producers.

It is mostly made in rural areas where the ingredients, usually fruit, are readily available. In modern times, home destillation was illegal since medieval time, it was a privilege of the nobility , as it constituted a tax fraud if not carried out at a licensed distillery, however it was, and is quite widespread.

Community distilleries also exist, operated by one or more villages, to make maintaining the equipment profitable in case of rented distill-time, however, the personal quota is 50 liters.

Icelandic moonshine Landi is distilled mash gambri or landabrugg. Although potatoes and sugar are the most common constituent of Icelandic moonshine, any carbohydrate can be used, including stale bread.

Landi is often consumed by people who cannot buy alcohol, either due to their young age or distance from the nearest alcohol store.

Locally produced moonshine is known in India as tharra. In South India, moonshine is any alcoholic drink not made in distilleries. Toddy and arrack are not synonyms or Indian names for moonshine liquor.

Toddy or taddy is an alcoholic beverage made from the sap of palm trees, and arrack refers to strong spirits made traditionally from fermented fruit juices, and the sap of the palm tree.

In the Indian state of Goa , a locally produced cashew flavored drink Feni is popular among locals and the tourists.

Many thousands of people have died consuming moonshine in India, including a number of major incidents with over dead at a time, often — but not exclusively — associated with methanol poisoning of the victims, where highly toxic methanol is used as a cheap way, as compared to the proper use of ethanol , to increase the alcohol content of moonshine.

Arrack is commonly produced as moonshine, and has resulted in deaths from contaminants. Arak especially Aragh sagi made from various kinds of fruit based liqueurs as well as from wine is commonly produced as moonshine.

Its underground production practices have resulted in deaths from contaminants. Also because of the danger of carrying Arak in Iran as a forbidden drink in Islam or simply the difficulty of finding it, some use pure ethanol made for chemical uses which increases the chance of alcohol poisoning.

The term is a diminutive of the word pota ' a pot'. As elsewhere, poteen is the basis for extensive folklore with crafty hillsmen pitted against the "excise men" as in the song The Hackler from Grouse Hall.

In the past, the wisp of smoke on an isolated hillside was what gave the poteen-maker away: in modern times this risk was removed by the use of bottled gas to fire the clandestine still.

Clandestine distillation of alcohol typically from grapes which is called grappa was common in the once poor north eastern part of Italy, which still produces some of the finest grappa in the country but with tighter control over the supply of distillation equipment its popularity has slumped.

However, distillation of grappa still continues in the rural areas of Italy especially in the south where control over distilling equipment is not as rigid.

Typically, families produce small quantities for their own consumption and for gifts to others. Nowadays, the supply of production equipment larger than three litres is controlled, and anything smaller must bear a sign stating that moonshine production is illegal.

On the island of Sardinia , one can still find local varieties of abbardenti a distillate similar to spanish aguardiente or italian grappa which is dubbed ' fil'e ferru ', which means 'iron-thread' in the Sardinian language ; this peculiar name comes from the fact that jugs and bottles were buried to hide them from authorities with iron-thread tied to them for later retrieval.

Legal production occurs both by large-scale industrial producers as well as small producers who still use the traditional formerly illegal methods.

Illegally distilled alcohol is widely made in Kenya, known as " Changaa ", " Kumi kumi " or "Kill me quick". It is mostly made from maize and produced with crude stills made from old oil drums.

It has been known to cause blindness and death. This may be caused by unscrupulous adulteration by sellers who want to give the beverage more 'kick', for example, adding battery acid.

It may be caused by impure distillation. After being illegal in Kenya for many years, the Kenyan government legalised the traditional home-brewed spirit in , in an effort to take business away from establishments where toxic chemicals are added to the brew to make it stronger.

In Laos Lao People's Democratic Republic the home distillation of spirits is technically illegal, although this law is rarely enforced.

Usually brewed from rice, it varies from well produced, smooth tasting liquor to very rough spirits with many impurities. The brewing kettle commonly is an old aluminum milk-can approximately 40l.

Normally sugar, baker's yeast and water is fermented for few weeks and then distilled with help of gas-burner or wood-cooker. Typically, the moonshine is made out of grapes, which are the leftovers from the production of wine, but also made from plums Slivovica.

Moonshine is highly popular because it is commonly used for medicinal purposes. This process usually uses diluted moonshine with caramelised sugar, and the liquor is then boiled and consumed while still hot.

In Malawi moonshine is commonly brewed and distilled by women in townships and villages. Known as "kachasu" or "Jang'ala" in Chichewa, various sources of starch may be used including potatoes, sugar cane or maize.

Although technically illegal, there is no social stigma attached to moderate consumption. In the state of Sarawak , moonshine is called Langkau, meaning 'hut' in the Iban language, which is where people cook them illegally.

Langkau is made from fermented rice wine tuak and cooked in a barrel with a little house hanging off the top of the barrel. Some rural folks like to drink 'Langkau' at festivals and during leisure hours.

In Sabah, a drink similar to 'Langkau' is called 'Montoku'. Mexico has a variety of home-made alcohol based on sugar cane or agave. The most common name for sugar-cane based moonshine is 'win' in the central Mexican states or ' charanda ' in Michoacan in the west coast.

Agave-based distilled beverages are generally named ' mezcal '. However, depending on the region, it can take the names of ' tequila ', ' sotol ', or ' bacanora '.

The legal product is usually made from fruit since there are statutes against diverting grain away from human consumption. Distilled liquor made from grain may also be called daru or double-daru if distilled twice.

Legal raksi is seldom aged; usually quite harsh to the taste. Illegal daru may be smoother, or it can be poisonous if improperly prepared.

It is not uncommon for Nepalese to tell outsiders that the concoction does not exist. New Zealand is one of the few western societies where home distillation is legal for personal consumption but not for private sale.

In New Zealand, stills and instruction in their use are sold openly. Hokonui moonshine was produced in Southland by early settlers whose then illegal distilling activities gained legendary status; see Hokonui Hills.

Hokonui Moonshine is now produced legally and commercially by the Southern Distilling Company which has recently started to export it.

In the country of Nicaragua, home distilled spirits are called "Cususa". It is distilled by means of a cold bowl of water porra placed over a metal drum full of the fermented corn.

A tube channels the condensation to a bottle. In Nigeria, home based brewing is illegal. Moonshine is variously called ' ogogoro ', 'kai-kai', 'kainkain', 'Abua first eleven', 'agbagba', 'akpeteshi', 'aka mere', 'push me, I push you', 'koo koo juice', 'crazy man in the bottle', or ' Sapele water' particularly in Delta State , depending on locality.

Following the addition of other herbal substances the product may be referred to as "man powa". Due to the very high taxation of alcohol, moonshine production—primarily from potatoes and sugar—remains a popular, albeit illegal, activity in most parts of the country.

A more contemporary name is "sputnik" after the Soviet satellites, a joke that the liquor's strength could send one into orbit. In the old days on Finnskogen they called the mash Skogens vin "Wine of the forest" , a name used by poorer people without access to distilling equipment.

When talking to foreigners, some Norwegians use the term "something local" about their moonshine. In Norway, moonshine is commonly mixed with coffee, and sometimes a spoon of sugar.

This drink is known as karsk , and has a special tie to the mid- and north-Norwegian regions, but is also enjoyed elsewhere. Add coffee to the cup until the coin can no longer be seen, then add hjemmebrent, straight from the still until the coin can again be seen.

Apple juice is also a common beverage for mixing, as it is said to "kill the taste" of bad moonshine. While brewing is permitted in Norway, distillation is not.

Possession of equipment capable of distilling is also illegal. Alcohol is strictly licensed or otherwise illegal in Pakistan. The heat source is typically a W dip heater.

A pot still is a type of distillation apparatus or still used to distill flavored liquors such as whisky or cognac , but not rectified spirit because they are bad at separating congeners.

Pot stills operate on a batch distillation basis as opposed to a Coffey or column stills which operate on a continuous basis. Traditionally constructed from copper , pot stills are made in a range of shapes and sizes depending on the quantity and style of spirit desired.

Poorly produced moonshine can be contaminated, mainly from materials used in the construction of the still.

Stills employing automotive radiators as condensers are particularly dangerous; in some cases, glycol produced from antifreeze can be a problem.

Radiators used as condensers could also contain lead at the connections to the plumbing. Using these methods often resulted in blindness or lead poisoning [6] in those who consumed tainted liquor.

Consumption of lead-tainted moonshine is a serious risk factor for saturnine gout , a very painful but treatable medical condition that damages the kidneys and joints.

Although methanol is not produced in toxic amounts by fermentation of sugars from grain starches, [9] contamination is still possible by unscrupulous distillers using cheap methanol to increase the apparent strength of the product.

Moonshine can be made both more palatable and perhaps less dangerous by discarding the "foreshot" — the first few ounces of alcohol that drip from the condenser.

Because methanol vaporizes at a lower temperature than ethanol it is commonly believed that the foreshot contains most of the methanol, if any, from the mash.

However, research shows this is not the case, and methanol is present until the very end of the distillation run. This is especially true during the distilling process when vaporized alcohol may accumulate in the air to dangerous concentrations if adequate ventilation is not provided.

The incidence of impure moonshine has been documented to significantly increase the risk of renal disease among those who regularly consume it, primarily from increased lead content.

Outbreaks of methanol poisoning have occurred when methanol is used to adulterate moonshine bootleg liquor. A quick estimate of the alcoholic strength, or proof, of the distillate the ratio of alcohol to water is often achieved by shaking a clear container of the distillate.

Large bubbles with a short duration indicate a higher alcohol content, while smaller bubbles that disappear more slowly indicate lower alcohol content.

A more reliable method is to use an alcoholmeter or hydrometer. A hydrometer is used during and after the fermentation process to determine the potential alcohol percent of the moonshine, whereas an alcoholmeter is used after the product has been distilled to determine the volume percent or proof.

A common folk test for the quality of moonshine was to pour a small quantity of it into a spoon and set it on fire. The theory was that a safe distillate burns with a blue flame, but a tainted distillate burns with a yellow flame.

Practitioners of this simple test also held that if a radiator coil had been used as a condenser, then there would be lead in the distillate, which would give a reddish flame.

This led to the mnemonic , "Lead burns red and makes you dead. Other toxic components, such as methanol , cannot be detected with a simple burn test, as methanol flames are also blue and difficult to see in daylight.

Moonshine historically referred to "clear, unaged whiskey", [19] once made with barley in Scotland and Ireland or corn mash in the United States, [20] though sugar became just as common in illicit liquor during the last century.

The word originated in the British Isles as a result of excise laws, but only became meaningful in the United States after a tax passed during the Civil War outlawing non-registered stills.

Illegal distilling accelerated during the Prohibition era which mandated a total ban on alcohol production under the Eighteenth Amendment of the Constitution.

Since the amendment's repeal in , laws focus on evasion of taxation on any type of spirits or intoxicating liquors. Applicable laws were historically enforced by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives of the US Department of Justice , but are now usually handled by state agencies.

Enforcement agents were once known colloquially as "revenuers". The earliest known instance of the term "moonshine" being used to refer to illicit alcohol dates to the copy of Grose's Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

Prior to that, "moonshine" referred to anything "illusory" or to literally the light of the moon.

Government considers the word a "fanciful term" and does not regulate its use on the labels of commercial products, as such, legal moonshines may be any type of spirit, which must be indicated elsewhere on the label.

Moonshine distillation was done at night to avoid discovery. As a study of farmers in Cocke County, Tennessee , observes: "One could transport much more value in corn if it was first converted to whiskey.

One horse could haul ten times more value on its back in whiskey than in corn. Sutton's life was covered in a documentary on the Discovery Channel called "Moonshiners".

The bootlegger once said that the malt a combination of corn, barley, rye is what makes the basic moonshine recipe work.

Once the liquor was distilled, drivers called " runners " or "bootleggers" smuggled moonshine and "bootleg" illegally imported liquor across the region in cars specially modified for speed and load-carrying capacity.

This is a list of moonshine produced in various countries. The term bathtub gin refers to any style of homemade spirit made in amateur conditions of historical reason.

Some distilled drinks on the list below are flavored , and a few also national liquors. The number of jurisdictions that ban alcoholic beverage sales has steadily decreased, which means many of former moonshine consumers are much nearer to a legal alcohol sales outlet than before.

Was Ist Moonshine Video

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